Abstracts

Led by Kurt W. Fischer

In the current age of biology, society is looking to brain science, genetics, and cognitive science to inform and improve education. There is much to be learned from this research about learning and teaching, but there are also many myths and scams that use brain...

Led by Kurt W. Fischer
Assessment should have a major role in what happens in classrooms and other learning environments. For many teachers and students, informal and quasi-formal assessment does shape teaching and learning. In contrast, the assessments of high-stakes testing are decontextualized and thus difficult to connect to learning...

Led by Kurt W. Fischer

The world of genetics has been turned on its head. Suddenly what we thought we knew about how DNA and genes work has changed dramatically, with the result that genes and environment can no longer be set up as opposites. The new message is that Nature (genetics)...

Led by Michael Andrew Clarke
In this session we will review some of the major Philosophies of Education and cite some of the major thinkers in education from Confucius through Herbert Spencer, John Dewey, Jean Piaget, to Linda Darling-Hammond, and Howard Gardner. In the session we will also examine the impact of...

Led by Michael Andrew Clarke

Assessments play an important part in our lives whether it is an academic assessment, a clinical assessment, a social assessment or some other type of assessment. Often we know what indicators we are examining but are they truly indicators of the thing that...

Led by Michael Andrew Clarke

In this session we will explore the nature and language of assessment. We will discuss the purpose of assessments. This will include the intended purpose, the articulated purpose, the functional purpose, the actual purpose, and the impact of assessments...

Led by Jane Holmes Bernstein

What do teachers teach? They teach learners. What do learners learn with? The ‘organ of learning’ is the brain. But the brain cannot “do learning” on its own: it needs something to learn with and about, it needs experience. The product of learning is...

Led by Jane Holmes Bernstein

The ability to regulate one’s behavior at a level appropriate for age is crucial for effective learning at all ages. This capacity for ‘self regulation’ is based on a suite of skills that support emotion regulation, behavioral modulation and executive...

Led by Jane Holmes Bernstein

No modern society can afford NOT to make an investment in the brains of its youngest citizens – and the investment must be made in the very earliest years. Building a brain depends on relationships, interactions and exploration. Critical “brain food”...

Led by L. Todd Rose

Modern research in the learning sciences (including neuroscience) has radically changed how we think about learning. Rejecting the myth of an average learner, this new approach to learning instead emphasizes the importance of variability and the role that context...

Led by L. Todd Rose

Working memory – the ability to hold and manipulate information in your mind – is a powerful predictor of individual differences in academic outcomes, and it is the foundation for executive functions such as planning, organization, and goal-directed behavior. And yet...

Led by L. Todd Rose

It seems clear that digital technologies will play an increasingly influential role in learning and education in the coming years. What is much less clear is whether this is a good thing or not. On the one hand, digital technologies provide us with perhaps the best...

Led by Christina Hinton

Education lacks a strong infrastructure for connecting research and practice. By contrast, there is a close link between research and practice in medicine, which is supported by teaching hospitals in which researchers and practitioners work together. Education...

Led by Christina Hinton

With a globally interconnected economy, unprecedented levels of migration, and a continuous stream of information circulating the planet, students are growing up in a globalized world. In this era of globalization, many educators are calling for education that...

Led by Christina Hinton

Cultural evolution has vastly outpaced biological evolution. A baby born into this situation would flounder if it were not for a remarkable quality of the brain – plasticity – and a key institution – schools. The brain is fundamentally adaptive, and culture is a...